Lesson Plans

To balance the critical with comedy, I’ve begun a list of lesson plans for anyone to peruse, whether it be academic or otherwise. Live, Love, Laugh and Learn!

 

Senior Literature Lesson Plan #1

OBJECTIVE:

Increased understanding of foreshadow, as well as conflict and tension, through a writing exercise subordinated to a small scene with narrative and dialogue between two people, not to mention further analysis of James Thurber’s The Catbird Seat to include vocabulary words and a poetry in which tension is the theme.

PROCEDURES:

(20 min.) Free Writing Exercise – Write a dialogue between two people in which one person is keeping a secret from the other. Without stating the secret in the text, that secret should be implied to the reader through action and indirect forms of dialogue, i.e. a pregnant teenager says, “You’ll know in a couple months,” holding her belly.

(15 min.) Free Writing Discussion – Share and discuss foreshadow, conflict and tension.

(15 min.) Poem of the Day – Examine Emily Dickinson’s Because I could not stop for Death and discuss tension and conflict.

(10 min.) Vocabulary – SAT vocabulary.

(30 min.) Related Exercises – Handouts/Worksheets on James Thurber’s The Catbird Seat.

ASSIGNMENT:

Handouts/Worksheets on James Thurber’s The Catbird Seat.

___________________________________

Senior Literature Lesson Plan #2

OBJECTIVE:

Increased understanding of dialect, to include slang, accent and the other (Ebonics, Upper Peninsula speak, Wisconsin, Southern drawl, Uber-Intellectual (yuppy uppity talk) through reading Thomas Wolfe’s Only the Dead Know Brooklyn and performing a writing exercise in

PROCEDURES:

(20 min.) Free Writing Exercise – Write a dialogue that matches one I’ve already written where every third noun is the opposite of what I intend. The scenario is the students have to respond to my lines of dialogue and figure out what I really mean. The exercise is intended to get people to think of other ways people speak and how difficult it is to adapt and change to the “norm.”

(15 min.) Free Writing Discussion – After twenty minutes of writing, I would ask them what was different about how I spoke and how could they better understand me.

(15 min.) Poem of the Day – Examine Lewis Carroll’s Jabberwhocky

(10 min.) Vocabulary – SAT vocabulary.

(30 min.) Related Exercises – Class read aloud Thomas Wolfe’s Only the Dead Know Brooklyn.

ASSIGNMENT:

Create a poem similar to Carroll’s Jabberwhocky ready to read in class. Poll the class on what they believe each poem means. How can you get their point across with gibberish? Examine tone, annunciation, inflection, etc…

 


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